Meat-Eating vs. Vegetarianism: the Practice of Karuna in Theravada Buddhism and Chinese Mahayana Buddhism

Authors

  • Nur Suriya Mohd Nor

Keywords:

Theravada Buddhism, Chinese Mahayana Buddhism, Meat-eating, Vegetarianism, Monastic

Abstract

The aim of this study is to discuss the practice of compassion (karuna) according to Theravada Buddhism and Chinese Mahayana Buddhism. The researcher also emphasises on the practice of karuna among these two traditions with special focus to meat-eating and vegetarianism. This research applies qualitative methodology, in which the researchers use nonnumerical data that includes content and critical analysis on written materials such as books, articles, and internet sources. The findings reveal that both traditions emphasis on compassion, but they are different in terms of their practice. Theravada Buddhism believes that meat-eating is not against the practise of compassion, while Chinese Mahayana Buddhism practises vegetarianism as a way to show their compassion towards the others.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

A. Irons, E. Encyclopedia of Buddhism. New York: Facts on File. 278. 2008

Amaganda Sutta, http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Suttas/Amagandha/amagandha.html.

Retrieved August 2, 2011.

Batchelor, M. The Path of Compassion. Walnut Greek: Altamira Press. 3. 1992.

Buddhist Text Translation Society (USA). The Brahma Net Sutra.

http://www.purifymind.com/BrahmaNetSutra.htm, Retrieved July 26, 2011.

C.C.Chang, G. (trans.). A Treasury of Mahayana Sutra: Selections from the Maharatnakuta Sutra. London: The Pennsylvania State University Press. 472. 1983.

Dhammavuddo Thero. The Buddha’s View on Meat Eating. Penang: Chee Khoon Printings. 50. 2008.

Gellner, D.N. Monk, Householder, and Tantric Priest. New York: Cambridge University Press. 218. 1992.

Harvey, P. An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 159. 2000.

Heng-ching Shih. The Syncretism of Chan and Pure Land Buddhism. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. 52. 1992.

Horner, I.B. The Book of Discipline. Oxford: The Pali Text Society. vol.II. 164. 2004.

Horner, I.B. (trans.). The Book of Discipline. “Cullavagga.” Oxford: The Pali Text Society. vol. V. 100. 2001.

Horner, I.B. (trans.). The Book of Discipline. “Mahavagga.” Lancaster: The Pali Text Society. vol. IV. 30. 2007.

J. Corless, R. The Vision of Buddhism. New York: Paragon House. 89. 1989.

Lu K’uan Yu. (trans.). Surangama Sutra (Sri Lanka: Brighthill Buddhist Centre).

http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/surangama.pdf, retrieved August 2, 2011.

Mahasi Sayadaw. A Discourse on Brahmavihara Dhamma. U Min Swe (trans.). Petaling Jaya: Selangor Buddhist Vipassana Meditation Society. 1985.

Nanamoli (trans.). The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha (Majjhima Nikaya). Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society. 45. 1995.

Nyanatiloka .Buddhist Dictionary: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines. Nyanaponika (ed.). Sri Lanka: Buddhist Publication Society. 95. 1980.

Patton, C. (trans.). Mahaparinirvana Sutra.

http://www.zhaxizhuoma.net/DHARMA/Tripitaka/MahaparinirvanaMahayana.htm, Retrieved August 2, 2011.

S. Gunn, A. and Walker, R. Buddhism and Environmental Ethics in Context. Petaling Jaya: Centre for Civilisational Dialogue. 2003.

Southwold, M. Buddhism in Life: The Anthropology Studies of Religion and the Sinhalese Practice of Buddhism. Manchester: Manchester University Press. 66. 1983.

Walse, M. (trans.). The Long Discourses of the Buddha (Digha Nikaya). London: Wisdom Publication, 1987.

Woodward, F.L. (trans). The Book of Gradual Sayings (Anguttara Nikaya). Lancaster: The Pali Text Society. vol. III. 41. 2006.

Downloads

Published

2021-03-01

How to Cite

Mohd Nor, N. S. . (2021). Meat-Eating vs. Vegetarianism: the Practice of Karuna in Theravada Buddhism and Chinese Mahayana Buddhism. AL-ITQAN: JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC SCIENCES AND COMPARATIVE STUDIES, 5(1), 51–63. Retrieved from https://journals.iium.edu.my/al-itqan/index.php/al-itqan/article/view/189