Murakami Haruki and the Ideology of Late-capitalist Japan: Learning How to <i>Dance Dance Dance <i>

Authors

  • Jonathan Dil, Chuo University, Japan

Abstract

Murakami Haruki‟s sixth novel, Dance Dance Dance, while offering a direct critique of conditions in late-capitalist Japan, is also a work implicated in maintaining the ideological mystifications of the age. At the same time, its underlying exploration of death undermines the simple idea that it is merely a work about the need to give up private forms of therapy and to engage in public acts of commitment. Rather, it is a transitionary work in Murakami's continued effort to seek both public expressions of commitment and a personal reconciliation with the finality of death.

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Author Biography

Jonathan Dil, Chuo University, Japan

Jonathan Dil completed his Ph.D. in 2008 at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. His graduating thesis was entitled Murakami Haruki and the Search for Self-therapy. He is presently a lecturer at Chuo University in Tokyo, Japan.

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Published

2010-12-15

How to Cite

Dil, Chuo University, Japan, J. (2010). Murakami Haruki and the Ideology of Late-capitalist Japan: Learning How to &lt;i&gt;Dance Dance Dance &lt;i&gt;. Asiatic: IIUM Journal of English Language and Literature, 4(2), 34–48. Retrieved from https://journals.iium.edu.my/asiatic/index.php/ajell/article/view/412

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Articles