REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING LOCALLY AVAILABLE INEXPENSIVE TARO AND WATER HYACINTH AS BIOSORBENT

  • Shahjalal Khandaker Department of Textile Engineering Dhaka University of Engineering & Technology Gazipur-1700, Bangladesh.
  • Ganesh Chandra Saha Department of Civil Engineering, Dhaka University of Engineering & Technology, Gazipur 1700, Bangladesh.
  • Mohammad Al Mamun Miah Sub-Assistant Engineer, Ministry of Road Transport & Bridges, Roads and Highways Department, Bangladesh.

Abstract

In this investigation, locally available and inexpensive Taro and Water Hyacinth were used as biosorbents to remove chromium from synthetic wastewater. The removal of this metal ion from water in the batch and column method have been studied and discussed. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm studies were also carried out. The material exhibits good adsorption capacity and the data follow both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Scanning Electronic Microscopic image was also used to understand the surface characteristics of biosorbent before and after biosorption studies. Effects of various factors such as pH, adsorbent dose, adsorbate initial concentration, particle size etc. were analyzed. The initial concentrations of chromium were considered 5-30mgL-1 in batch method and only 4mgL-1 in column method. The maximum chromium adsorbed was 1.64 mgg-1 and 4.44 mgg-1 in Batch method and 1.15 mgg-1 and 0.75 mgg-1 in Column method. Batch and Column desorption and regeneration studies were conducted. Column desorption studies indicated that both of these biosorbents could be reused for removing heavy metals. Results of the laboratory experiments show that the performance of Taro and Water Hyacinth prove that they can effectively be used as low cost biosorbents for the removal of chromium from wastewater.

KEYWORDS:   adsorption; chromium removal; Taro; water hyacinth; batch method; column studies

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Published
2016-04-30
How to Cite
Khandaker, S., Saha, G. C., & Miah, M. A. M. (2016). REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING LOCALLY AVAILABLE INEXPENSIVE TARO AND WATER HYACINTH AS BIOSORBENT. IIUM Engineering Journal, 17(1), 49-62. https://doi.org/10.31436/iiumej.v17i1.568
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Articles